These top 10 most frequently cited safety violations have held their ranks in the top 10 for 4 years straight.  Does this tell you what top 10 things that an OSHA Compliance Officer will be looking for at your facility?

 

 

 

 

 

2015

2014

2013

2012

1

1926.501

FALL PROTECTION

1926.501

FALL PROTECTION

1926.501

FALL PROTECTION

1926.501

FALL PROTECTION

2

1910.1200

HAZARD COMMUNICATIONS

1910.1200

HAZARD COMMUNICATIONS

1910.1200

HAZARD COMMUNICATIONS

1910.1200

HAZARD COMMUNICATIONS

3

1926.451

SCAFFOLDING

1926.451

SCAFFOLDING

1926.451

SCAFFOLDING

1926.451

SCAFFOLDING

4

1910.134

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

1910.134

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

1910.134

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

1910.134

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

5

1910.147

LOCKOUT / TAGOUT

1910.178

POWERED INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS

1910.303

ELECTRICAL, WIRING METHODS

1926.1053

LADDERS

6

1910.178

POWERED INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS

1910.147

LOCKOUT / TAGOUT

1910.178

POWERED INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS

1910.212

MACHINE GUARDING

7

1926.1053

LADDERS

1926.1053

LADDERS

1926.1053

LADDERS

1910.178

POWERED INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS

8

1910.303

ELECTRICAL, WIRING METHODS

1910.303

ELECTRICAL, WIRING METHODS

1910.147

LOCKOUT / TAGOUT

1910.303

ELECTRICAL, WIRING METHODS

9

1910.212

MACHINE GUARDING

1910.212

MACHINE GUARDING

1910.303

ELECTRICAL, GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

1910.147

LOCKOUT / TAGOUT

10

1910.303

ELECTRICAL, GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

1910.303

ELECTRICAL, GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

1910.212

MACHINE GUARDING

1910.303

ELECTRICAL, GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

 

Take a moment to inspect your facility for these and other safety violations. Make sure you have properly trained your employees and that they are complying with that training.

 

What could have prevented these fatalities / injuries?

 

  1. Fall Protection. An employee was engaged in painting work at a water tank. He was positioned on a catwalk and painting the interior of the tank. Employee fell from the catwalk to the floor below, a fall height of approximately 60 feet. Employee was killed.
  2. Hazard Communications. An employee, a Tank Cleaner, was getting ready to work on a tractor trailer tanker. The employee dropped his flashlight into the tanker and went into the tanker to retrieve it. The tanker had just been emptied of Gantrez S-97, which is a copolymer used in toothpaste. The product had been purged from the tanker by pumping Nitrogen into the tanker which would help remove the product.
  3. Ladders. An employee was applying commercial siding to a new multi-family apartment building being constructed. He was working from a pump jack scaffold raised 49 feet above the lower level. Some witness stated that the employee unhooked his lanyard to lean out toward the building from the scaffold and install a soffit vent. The employee slipped and fell to the concrete footer below, incurring severe head injuries. Emergency services were called. Emergency medical responders arrived at the site. The employee had died.
  4. Respiratory Protection. An employee was performing a bathtub resurfacing that involved the removal of the second layer of bathtub coating. The employee was using aircraft paint stripper containing methylene chloride. The employee was working alone in a small restroom with only the use of a ceiling fan with the door closed. There were no windows in the bathroom. The home owner went to notify the worker that she was leaving and when she received no response, she opened the door and found the employee hunched over the side of the bathtub, with his head submerged in the bathtub that was filled with 2 in. of water. The owner and a neighbor removed the employee from the tub and performed chest compressions. The employee was not using a respirator or an exhaust fan (portable ventilation fan) during the stripping operations. The employee was transported to an area hospital, where he died two days later.
  5. Lockout / Tagout. An employee climbed under a machine to apparently clean or clear out a broken piece of pallet. The machine was not powered down. While he was under the machine, it cycled and pinned him. The employee could not breathe and died.
  6. Powered Industrial Trucks. An employee was moving steel beams using a forklift to lift a 50 foot steel beam. The employee needed to move the steel beam to gain access to pallets of steel decking. The employee raised the steel beam approximately 9 feet and then left the cab of the forklift to place a cribbage underneath. The steel beam fell from the forklift and struck the employee on the head and chest area. The 50 foot (5,000 pound) steel beam killed the employee.
  7. An employee was working at a commercial building. He was descending a fixed ladder while carrying two five-gallon empty plastic buckets in his right hand and gripping the ladder's left handrail with his left hand. The worker momentarily lost his grip on the handrail. As he tried to reestablish his grip, he lost his balance. He fell approximately 15 feet to the floor. He sustained a fatal concussion.
  8. Electrical, Wiring Methods. An employee was attempting to remove a piece of armored electrical cable from a junction box located on the top of a wall that was to be demolished. The employee grabbed the cable and attempted to pull it from the box. He sustained a 277- volt shock and fell from the ladder to the floor. He died from the electric shock.
  9. Machine Guarding. An employee was using a grinder to "dress" a cast iron rail road track to make it fit together. The employee had just picked up the grinder, which had been on the company equipment truck because it had a new grinding wheel. He was grinding for approximately 45 seconds when the wheel exploded, severely injuring his left leg and cutting his right leg. The employee was hospitalized and treated for his injuries.
  10. Electrical, General Requirements. An employee was mounting a disconnect switch for a heating, ventilation and air conditioning unit. He was working from a mobile platform that was approximately 4.9 meters above the ground. He was using a drill connected to an extension cord set. The cord set had exposed conductors and was not protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter. The employee was electrocuted.

 

Most of the corrections to prevent the serious injury or death are a simple fix. No one comes to work with the attitude that they are going to die or get hurt today. Let’s do all that we can to prevent this from happening.

 

As an Authorized OSHA 10 & 30 Trainer with over 30 years of safety experience, our Safety Director Bob Revels can help your company with any of your safety inspection and safety training needs (i.e., Forklift Training, Global Harmonized System (Hazard Communications training), Fall Protection Training, Lockout/Tagout Training, Recordkeeping, Drug Testing, etc.)

 

Give Bob a call today at 828-335-0088!